WeTheWomen

Urmila Matondkar, Khushbu Sundar, Nusrat Jahan

In the patriarchal society that we live in, we are conditioned to certain thought processes. In a society that lauds the achievements of a man, women’s achievements can be overlooked. Social norms have often conditioned us from stymying the potential of women in the workforce. In every field, there is a distinctive gender disparity which hinders progress and has become the invisible barrier to women’s growth.

However, as per the ‘Women in Business 2021,’ by the global accounting firm Grant Thornton, India stood third in the area of women working in senior management positions. India has over 39% of females in the workforce in senior management positions. Despite these numbers, women are subjected to sexist comments from their peers.


By Team Mojo, 18 Sep 2021


However, as per the ‘Women in Business 2021,’ by the global accounting firm Grant Thornton, India stood third in the area of women working in senior management positions. India has over 39% of females in the workforce in senior management positions. Despite these numbers, women are subjected to sexist comments from their peers.

Speaking of gender parity, gender equality, patriarchy and women in politics, Urmila Matondkar, Khushbu Sundar and Nusrat Jahan express their thoughts in conversation with Barkha Dutt in the global Townhall, an event organized by We the Women.

These three women have been leading actors in the field of cinema and have shifted to politics. Sharing her journey, Khushbu Sundar said, “I think it’s very difficult for a woman from the field of cinema, to go public. I had to hear statements like, “You are fit only to prance around, you shouldn’t be intelligent; only we men are here to do so.”

She went on further to say that “Men feel intimidated by women who have a strong mind, confidence, are intelligent and if she can call the shots.” The field of cinema and politics are difficult places for women to survive. But Khushbu Sundar finds the cinema industry more welcoming than politics.

Each of these women received a backlash when they joined politics. Nusrat Jahan shares some of the bitter comments that she heard. “When men are oppressed, they call it tragedy; when women are oppressed it is called tradition.”

It wasn’t a bed of roses for me. They judged me for the way I dressed. When me and my friends wore pantsuits to the Parliament, there was hue and cry about it. We had male MPs also wearing denims in the parliament, but nobody pointed that out.”

“The political field is more patriarchal than the cinema field.”

Constant comments against one’s gender isn’t a righteous thing to do. In the world of the internet today, trolls pass comments on every single thing. Nusrat Jahan remarks “According to them, trollers are lovers in disguise. India is all about religion. The whole of India trolled me because I married a Hindu. I got very nasty and demeaning comments.”

Women need to be recognized for the work that they do. Urmila Matondkar says “Politics is more sexist than cinema. I never let It affect me earlier, nor do I let it affect me now. Beyond a point people keep talking. I want a position not because I am a woman but because I am good at it.”

From speaking up for themselves to becoming deaf to comments, these women have broken several stereotypes. To get to know more about their journey watch the full interview below.